What years do nickels have silver in them

Though not so popular as they were in their heyday, Jefferson Nickels are still actively coins often have lovely toning that makes them particularly attractive. to 1941 and two 1942 issues (including the one year type 1942 P Proof silver.

Silver Nickels. One of the more unusual Silver coins was the Jefferson Nickel of 1942 to 1945. Jefferson Nickels were first minted in 1938 and made of 75% Copper and 25% Nickel. However, in 1942, with World War II raging in Europe and the Pacific, Nickel became a critical war material. The only US nickels to ever have any silver in them are the "War Nickels" of 1942-1945. Jefferson Nickels made between 1942 in 1945, are also called War Nickels and consisted of 35% silver. This means they are worth more than face value and most of them have been removed from circulation. An easy way to identify these more valuable coins is to look on the reverse. If there is a letter (P, D or S) over the dome of Monticello, then it is a silver coin. EXCEPT for the War Nickels 1942-1945 with the large mintmark above Monticello (including a 'P' for Philly) which have silver in them and are worth well above face. You should look for earlier-date nickels with mintmarks and key dates (e.g., 1950-D) and the very early Jeffersons. The only US nickels to ever have any silver in them are the "War Nickels" of 1942-1945.

Items 1 - 24 of 56 Buy Nickels at GovMint.com. and styles of the Jefferson Nickel from proof varieties (both Silver and Clad) which are found in annual Mint sets, 

5 Dec 2016 The only Jefferson nickels to contain silver were from 1942–1945 and they contained 35% silver. During those years nickel was needed for armor It is better to melt down silver coins minted before 1964 or keep them as coins? I want to  they contain a small amount of silver rather than nickel. In addition certain types of Jefferson Nickels may be vastly more collectable than others. Mint years   Silver Nickel. Values for the 1943 and 1944 war nickel types are also included. 1942 - 1945 Silver Jefferson Nickel Value (United States) The "Year" column lists the year and mint mark on the coin -- D is for Denver, S is for San Francisco, and P is for Philadelphia. EBAY AUCTIONS - SILVER "WAR" NICKELS ONLY  You probably have nickels worth more than face value in your pocket change are out there in circulation, and I know this because I've found many of them myself in pocket change and in rolls of coins that I've looked through over the years.

The only US nickels to ever have any silver in them are the "War Nickels" of 1942-1945.

Nickels made in 1942 through 1945 in circulated condition sell for junk silver status. Please note, they are 35% silver. Also, not all 1942 nickels are silver. BU coins have premium over junk status. Few nickels had circulated in the western states before the 1880s (people there preferred silver and gold coins); interest in the new Liberty Head design had led to increasing use of nickels there. Good economic conditions and high demand for nickels for use in coin-operated devices caused the piece to circulate throughout the nation by 1900. That year, Mint Director Not all 1942 nickels have the large mintmarks over Monticello. In fact, for most of 1942, the 5-cent coin was made from nickel. In October, this changed, since nickel was needed to make artillery for troops in World War II. Also worth noting… silver nickels aren’t made entirely from silver. In fact, the wartime nickel alloy consists of the The last year that silver nickels were made was 1945. Silver alloy nickels began production in October 1942. These so-called "war nickels" were minted in an effort to reduce the Mint's use of nickel, which became critically necessary for other purposes during World War II.

Bottom row, from left to right: Liberty nickel, buffalo nickel, silver wartime nickel In the early years of the United States, foreign coins circulated with US coins because These nickels have a large P, D, or S above the engraving of Monticello, 

EXCEPT for the War Nickels 1942-1945 with the large mintmark above Monticello (including a 'P' for Philly) which have silver in them and are worth well above face. You should look for earlier-date nickels with mintmarks and key dates (e.g., 1950-D) and the very early Jeffersons. The only US nickels to ever have any silver in them are the "War Nickels" of 1942-1945. Silver nickels were made from 1942 through 1945 and have a large mintmark over the dome of Monticello on the reverse. There are 3 mintmarks to look for on wartime nickels: “P” – Philadelphia If they only used Silver between 1942 to 1945, then why do All the nickels 1964 and before, look and sound different, than the one's after 1964? The metal is grey'er and not shinny in the older “War Nickels,” or Jefferson Nickels that were minted from 1942-1945, are also popular among coin collectors due to their historical significance and the fact that they contain a small amount of silver rather than nickel. In addition certain types of Jefferson Nickels may be vastly more collectable than others.

Items 1 - 24 of 56 Buy Nickels at GovMint.com. and styles of the Jefferson Nickel from proof varieties (both Silver and Clad) which are found in annual Mint sets, 

“War Nickels,” or Jefferson Nickels that were minted from 1942-1945, are also popular among coin collectors due to their historical significance and the fact that they contain a small amount of silver rather than nickel. In addition certain types of Jefferson Nickels may be vastly more collectable than others. Nickels made in 1942 through 1945 in circulated condition sell for junk silver status. Please note, they are 35% silver. Also, not all 1942 nickels are silver. BU coins have premium over junk status. Few nickels had circulated in the western states before the 1880s (people there preferred silver and gold coins); interest in the new Liberty Head design had led to increasing use of nickels there. Good economic conditions and high demand for nickels for use in coin-operated devices caused the piece to circulate throughout the nation by 1900. That year, Mint Director Not all 1942 nickels have the large mintmarks over Monticello. In fact, for most of 1942, the 5-cent coin was made from nickel. In October, this changed, since nickel was needed to make artillery for troops in World War II. Also worth noting… silver nickels aren’t made entirely from silver. In fact, the wartime nickel alloy consists of the

(Year containing 90% silver: 1964) The 1964 Kennedy Half Dollars, in circulated condition, are common and trade in relation to their silver content value. Rolls of uncirculated coins may be worth a slight premium. Kennedy Half Dollars dated 1965-1969 are 40% silver and also trade in relation to their silver content value. Dimes, Quarters, half dollars, and dollar coins before 1964 are 90% silver. Also half dollars from 1965-1969 have 40% silver in them. Silver nickels were minted during 1942-1945 and the nickels are only 35% silver. Any other nickels other than those dates aren't silver. Source(s): Have about 5 years experience. A 90% silver alloy was used to strike both Roosevelt and Mercury dimes that got struck before 1965. So, all Roosevelt and Mercury dimes from that era will have silver in them. Here’s an easy checklist to identify them: Year of issue 1964 or before; Is my coin Silver? How to tell if a coin is silver or not. Use our online handy dandy silver coin detector to see if your coin contains silver or not. This tool is for U.S. Silver Coins only. It does not do foreign coinage, sorry. Dime Nickel Quarter Half Dollar What Year was it minted? *This coin tool is free and was programmed by CoinTrackers.com Bookmark this page (Ctrl+D) and be sure to The only recent ones of value are the War Nickels (from 1942-1945). These nickels contain copper and silver instead of nickel and copper. These partial silver nickels were made without nickel Any United States dime, quarter, half dollar or dollar that is dated 1964 or earlier is made of 90% silver. In the dime series, all coins dated 1965 or later are clad coins and contain no silver at all. Silver Quarter Years. 1964 was the last year for silver quarters. Few nickels had circulated in the western states before the 1880s (people there preferred silver and gold coins); interest in the new Liberty Head design had led to increasing use of nickels there. Good economic conditions and high demand for nickels for use in coin-operated devices caused the piece to circulate throughout the nation by 1900. That year, Mint Director